5/16/2006

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I’ve been using Skype for months now as a replacement for my land line. And now it’s free to call land lines and cell phones within the United States and Canada. Cool! And of course PC to PC calls are still free. I was about to switch over to the Gizmo Project, another VoIP alternative to Skype, because their rates to call telephones in the US were half of Skype’s (1¢ per minute vs. roughly 2¢ per minute on Skype), but free is much, much better. Guess I’ll stick with Skype for right now.

Curious what the world will look like after a 7 meter (21 foot) rise in ocean levels? Then check out Flood Maps, an interesting use of Google Maps and NASA data. Browse around the world and see what it will look like after the flood.

I heard this on NPR this morning and I couldn’t believe it: The BBC put the wrong guy on television last week as a guest interviewee. Literally, they put the wrong Guy on television. After the decision was handed down on the Apple vs. Apple case last week Guy Kewney was scheduled to appear on air to discuss the verdict. When the production assistant went out to the lobby and called for Guy, Guy Goma, a job applicant got up and answered the call. Imagine his surprise when he was whisked into a studio and put live on the air. No wait, no need to imagine, here’s the video of Guy Goma fumbling his way through the interview. Look at the expression on his face when he realizes he’s on the air and mistaken for somebody else. It’s absolutely priceless. The UK newspaper the Mail on Sunday has the transcript of the interview and puts it succinctly. Face of Horror.

Came across a couple interesting stories last week about researchers using the logs of seventeenth century vessels to measure the historical strength and location of the magnetic pole. They concluded that the magnetic field is weakening, a finding that corroborates other research into the magnetic field.

Previous magnetic pole reversals were preceded by a weakening magnetic field, and this weakening fits the pattern. The field is still quite strong though, so researchers think a pole reversal could be several thousand years in the future if the weakening continues apace.